Awards & Publications

Ali H. Brivanlou

Robert & Harriet Heilbrunn Professor

Head of Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Molecular Embryology

PUBLICATIONS

  1. Brivanlou, A. H., and Harland, R. M. (1989). Expression of an Engrailed-Related Protein Is Induced in the Anterior Neural Ectoderm of Early Xenopus Embryos. Development. 106(3), 611-617. PubMed PMID: 2574664
  2. Condie, B. G., Brivanlou, A. H., and Harland, R. M. (1990). Most of the Homeobox-Containing Xhox 36 Transcripts in Early Xenopus Embryos Cannot Encode a Homeodomain Protein. Molecular and Cellular Biology. 10(7), 3376-3385. PubMed PMID: 1972542
  3. Brivanlou, A. H., Frank, D., Bolce, M. E., Brown, B. D., Sive, H. L., and Harland, R. M. (1990). Localization of Specific mRNAs in Xenopus Embryos by Whole-Mount in Situ Hybridization. Development. 110(2), 325-330. PubMed PMID: 1723941
  4. Brivanlou, A. H., Stewart, R. M., and Harland, R. M. (1990). Region-Specific Neural Induction of an Engrailed Protein by Anterior Notochord in Xenopus. Science. 250(4982), 800-802. PubMed PMID: 1978411
  5. Vize, P. D., Melton, D. A., Brivanlou, A. H., and Harland, R. M. (1991). Assays for Gene Function in Developing Xenopus Embryos. Methods in Cell Biology. 36, 367-387. PubMed PMID: 1811145
  6. Brivanlou, A. H., de la Torre, J. R., Holt, C., and Harland, R. M. (1991). Cephalic Expression and Molecular Characterization of Xenopus En-2. Development. 111(3), 715-724. PubMed PMID: 1679005
  7. Brivanlou, A. H., Wright, D. A., and Melton, D. A. (1992). Embryonic Expression and Functional Analysis of a Xenopus Activin Receptor. Developmental Dynamics: An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists. 194(1), 1-11. doi: 10.1002/aja.1001940102. PubMed PMID: 1384808
  8. Bolce, M. E., Brivanlou, A. H., Kushner, P. D., and Harland, R. M. (1992). Ventral Ectoderm of Xenopus Forms Neural Tissue, Including Hindbrain, in Response to Activin. Development. 115(3), 681-688. PubMed PMID: 1425347
  9. Brivanlou, A. H., Mann, R. W., and Harland, R. M. (1992). A Protein Expressed in the Growth Cones of Embryonic Vertebrate Neurons Defines a New Class of Intermediate Filament Protein. Neuron. 9(3), 417-428. PubMed PMID: 1524825
  10. Brivanlou, A. H., and Melton, D. A. (1992). A Truncated Activin Receptor Inhibits Mesoderm Induction and Formation of Axial Structures in Xenopus Embryos. Nature. 359(6396), 609-614. doi: 10.1038/359609a0. PubMed PMID: 1328888
  11. Dohrmann, C. E., Brivanlou, A. H., Thomsen, G. H., Fields, A., Woolf, T. M., and Melton, D. A. (1993). Expression of Activin mRNA During Early Development in Xenopus Laevis. Developmental Biology. 157(2), 474-483. doi: 10.1006/dbio.1993.1150. PubMed PMID: 8500654
  12. Bolce, M. E., Brivanlou, A. H., and Harland, R. M. (1993). XFKH2, a Xenopus HNF-3 Alpha Homologue, Exhibits Both Activin-Inducible and Autonomous Phases of Expression in Early Embryos. Developmental Biology. 160(2), 413-423. doi: 10.1006/dbio.1993.1317. PubMed PMID: 8253274
  13. Brivanlou, A. H., Kelly, O. G., and Melton, D. A. (1994). Follistatin, an Antagonist of Activin, Is Expressed in the Spemann Organizer and Displays Direct Neuralizing Activity. Cell. 77(2), 283-295. PubMed PMID: 8168135
  14. Brivanlou, A. H., and Melton, D. A. (1994). Inhibition of Activin Receptor Signaling Promotes Neuralization in Xenopus. Cell. 77(2), 273-281. PubMed PMID: 8168134
  15. Brivanlou, A. H., and Thomsen, G. H. (1995). Ventral Mesodermal Patterning in Xenopus Embryos: Expression Patterns and Activities of BMP-2 and BMP-4. Developmental Genetics. 17(1), 78-89. doi: 10.1002/dvg.1020170109. PubMed PMID: 7554498
  16. Wilson, P. A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1995). Induction of Epidermis and Inhibition of Neural Fate by Bmp-4. Nature. 376(6538), 331-333. doi: 10.1038/376331a0. PubMed PMID: 7630398
  17. Cox, W. G., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1995). Caudalization of Neural Fate by Tissue Recombination and bFGF. Development. 121(12), 4349-4358. PubMed PMID: 8575335
  18. Henry, G. L., Brivanlou, I. H., Kessler, D. S., Brivanlou, A. H., and Melton, D. A. (1996). TGF-β Signals and a Pattern in Xenopus Laevis Endodermal Development. Development. 122(3), 1007-1015. PubMed PMID: 8631246
  19. Weinstein, D. C., Rahman, S. M., Ruiz, J. C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1996). Embryonic Expression of Eph Signalling Factors in Xenopus. Mechanisms of Development. 57(2), 133-144. PubMed PMID: 8843391
  20. Honoré, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1996). In Vivo Evidence for Trigeminal Nerve Guidance by the Cement Gland in Xenopus. Developmental Biology. 178(2), 363-374. PubMed PMID: 8812135
  21. Lagna, G., Hata, A., Brivanlou, A. H., and Massagué, J. (1996). Partnership between DPC4 and SMAD Proteins in TGF-β Signalling Pathways. Nature. 383(6603), 832-836. doi: 10.1038/383832a0. PubMed PMID: 8893010
  22. Honoré, É., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). L'induction Neurale Chez Les Vertébrés: Le Cerveau Par DéfautMedecine et Science, 13, 192-200.
  23. Weinstein, D., Chang, C., Lagna, G., Suzuki, A., Wilson, P., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Neural Induction in the Frog Xenopus Laevis Inhibin, Activin and Follistatin (pp. 214-219): Springer.
  24. Brivanlou, A. H., and Melton, D. (1997b). Vertebrate Neural Induction. Annual Review of Neuroscience. 20, 43-60. doi: 10.1146/annurev.neuro.20.1.43. Review. PubMed PMID: 9056707
  25. Brivanlou, A. H., and Melton, D. (1997a). Vertebrate Embryonic Cells Will Become Nerve Cells Unless Told Otherwise. Cell. 88(1), 13-17. Review. PubMed PMID: 9019398
  26. Chang, C., Wilson, P. A., Mathews, L. S., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). A Xenopus Type I Activin Receptor Mediates Mesodermal but Not Neural Specification During Embryogenesis. Development. 124(4), 827-837. PubMed PMID: 9043064
  27. Weinstein, D. C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Neural Induction in Xenopus Laevis: Evidence for the Default Model. Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 7(1), 7-12. PubMed PMID: 9039789
  28. Suzuki, A., Chang, C., Yingling, J. M., Wang, X. F., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Smad5 Induces Ventral Fates in Xenopus Embryo. Developmental Biology. 184(2), 402-405. doi: 10.1006/dbio.1997.8548. PubMed PMID: 9133445
  29. Hoodless, P. A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Inhibitory Control of Neural Differentiation in Mammalian Cells. Development Genes and Evolution. 207(1), 19-28. doi: 10.1007/s004270050088. PubMed PMID: 20607477
  30. Wilson, P. A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Vertebrate Neural Induction: Inducers, Inhibitors, and a New Synthesis. Neuron. 18(5), 699-710. PubMed PMID: 9182796
  31. Altmann, C. R., Chow, R. L., Lang, R. A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Lens Induction by Pax-6 in Xenopus Laevis. Developmental Biology. 185(1), 119-123. doi: 10.1006/dbio.1997.8573. PubMed PMID: 9169055
  32. Wilson, P. A., Lagna, G., Suzuki, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Concentration-Dependent Patterning of the Xenopus Ectoderm by BMP4 and Its Signal Transducer Smad1. Development. 124(16), 3177-3184. PubMed PMID: 9272958
  33. Suzuki, A., Ueno, N., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Xenopus Msx1 Mediates Epidermal Induction and Neural Inhibition by BMP4. Development. 124(16), 3037-3044. PubMed PMID: 9272945
  34. Suzuki, A., Kaneko, E., Ueno, N., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Regulation of Epidermal Induction by Bmp2 and Bmp7 Signaling. Developmental Biology. 189(1), 112-122. PubMed PMID: 9281341
  35. Weinstein, D. C., Honoré, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1997). Epidermal Induction and Inhibition of Neural Fate by Translation Initiation Factor 4AIII. Development. 124(21), 4235-4242. PubMed PMID: 9334272
  36. de la Torre, J. R., Höpker, V. H., Ming, G. L., Poo, M. M., Tessier-Lavigne, M., Brivanlou, A. H., and Holt, C. E. (1997). Turning of Retinal Growth Cones in a Netrin-1 Gradient Mediated by the Netrin Receptor Dcc. Neuron. 19(6), 1211-1224. PubMed PMID: 9427245
  37. Lagna, G., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1998). Use of Dominant Negative Constructs to Modulate Gene Expression. Cellular and Molecular Procedures in Developmental Biology. 36, 75-98. Review. PubMed PMID: 9342522
  38. Hata, A., Lagna, G., Massagué, J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1998). Smad6 Inhibits BMP/Smad1 Signaling by Specifically Competing with the Smad4 Tumor Suppressor. Genes & Development, 12(2), 186-197. PubMed PMID: 9436979
  39. Chang, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1998a). Neural Crest Induction by Xwnt7B in Xenopus. Developmental Biology. 194(1), 129-134. doi: 10.1006/dbio.1997.8820. PubMed PMID: 9473337
  40. Mailhos, C., André, S., Mollereau, B., Goriely, A., Brivanlou, A. H., and Desplan, C. (1998). Drosophila Goosecoid Requires a Conserved Heptapeptide for Repression of Paired-Class Homeoprotein Activators. Development. 125(5), 937-947. PubMed PMID: 9449676
  41. Williams, S. C., Altmann, C. R., Chow, R. L., Brivanlou, A. H., and Lang, R. A. (1998). A Highly Conserved Lens Transcriptional Control Element from the Pax-6 Gene. Mechanisms of Development. 73(2), 225-229. PubMed PMID: 9622640
  42. Casellas, R., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1998). Xenopus Smad7 Inhibits Both the Activin and BMP Pathways and Acts as a Neural Inducer. Developmental Biology. 198(1), 1-12. PubMed PMID: 9640328
  43. Chang, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1998b). Cell Fate Determination in Embryonic Ectoderm. Journal of Neurobiology. 36(2), 128-151. Review. PubMed PMID: 9712300
  44. Weinstein, D. C., Marden, J., Carnevali, F., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1998). FGF-Mediated Mesoderm Induction Involves the Src-Family Kinase Laloo. Nature. 394(6696), 904-908. doi: 10.1038/29808. PubMed PMID: 9732875
  45. Brivanlou, A. H. (1998). Should the Master Regulator Rest in Peace? Nature Genetics. 20(2), 109-110. doi: 10.1038/2402. PubMed PMID: 9771697
  46. Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). Xenopus. Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 2793-2803.
  47. Reissmann, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). Neuronal Subtype Identity RegulationeLS.
  48. Weinstein, D. C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). Neural Induction. Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology. 15, 411-433. doi: 10.1146/annurev.cellbio.15.1.411. Review. PubMed PMID: 10611968
  49. Lagna, G., Carnevali, F., Marchioni, M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). Negative Regulation of Axis Formation and Wnt Signaling in Xenopus Embryos by the F-Box/WD40 Protein Β TrCP. Mechanisms of Development. 80(1), 101-106. PubMed PMID: 10096067
  50. Lagna, G., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). A Molecular Basis for Smad Specificity. Developmental Dynamics: An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists. 214(3), 269-277. PubMed PMID: 10090153
  51. Chang, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). Xenopus GDF6, a New Antagonist of Noggin and a Partner of Bmps. Development. 126(15), 3347-3357. PubMed PMID: 10393114
  52. Chow, R. L., Altmann, C. R., Lang, R. A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (1999). Pax6 Induces Ectopic Eyes in a Vertebrate. Development. 126(19), 4213-4222. PubMed PMID: 10477290
  53. Altmann, C. R., Bell, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2000). Genomics and Embryology in AmphibiansGenome Biology. 1(5), 4022.4022.
  54. Hata, A., Seoane, J., Lagna, G., Montalvo, E., Brivanlou, A. H., and Massagué, J. (2000). OAZ Uses Distinct DNA- and Protein-Binding Zinc Fingers in Separate BMP-Smad and Olf Signaling Pathways. Cell. 100(2), 229-240. PubMed PMID: 10660046
  55. Suzuki, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2000). Xenopus Embryonic E2F Is Required for the Formation of Ventral and Posterior Cell Fates During Early Embryogenesis. Molecular Cell. 5(2), 217-229. PubMed PMID: 10882064
  56. Chang, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2000). A Post-Mid-Blastula Transition Requirement for TGF-β Signaling in Early Endodermal Specification. Mechanisms of Development. 90(2), 227-235. PubMed PMID: 10640706
  57. Brivanlou, A. H. (2000). La Morphogenèse Du Système Nerveux Chez Les VertébrésMedecine et Science, 16, 150-158.
  58. Eggen, B. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). Bmp Antagonists and Neural InductioneLS.
  59. Altmann, C. R., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). Neural Patterning in the Vertebrate Embryo. International Review of Cytology, 203, 447-482. Review. PubMed PMID: 11131523
  60. Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). Early Posterior/Ventral Fate Specification in the Vertebrate EmbryoDevelopmental Biology. 237(1), 1-17. doi: 10.1006/dbio.2001.0350
  61. Zhang, Y., Chang, C., Gehling, D. J., Brivanlou, A. H., and Derynck, R. (2001). Regulation of Smad Degradation and Activity by Smurf2, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 98(3), 974-979. PubMed PMID: 11158580
  62. Weinstein, D. C., and Brivanlou, A. H. A. (2001). Src Family Kinase Function During Early Xenopus Development. Developmental Dynamics: An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists. 220(2), 163-168. PubMed PMID: 11169849
  63. Chang, C., Holtzman, D. A., Chau, S., Chickering, T., Woolf, E. A., Holmgren, L. M., Bodorova, J., Gearing, D. P., Holmes, W. E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). Twisted Gastrulation Can Function as a BMP Antagonist. Nature. 410(6827), 483-487. doi: 10.1038/35068583. PubMed PMID: 11260717
  64. Reissmann, E., Jörnvall, H., Blokzijl, A., Andersson, O., Chang, C., Minchiotti, G., Persico, M. G., Ibáñez, C. F., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). The Orphan Receptor ALK7 and the Activin Receptor ALK4 Mediate Signaling by Nodal Proteins During Vertebrate Development. Genes & Development. 15(15), 2010-2022. doi: 10.1101/gad.201801. PubMed PMID: 11485994
  65. Altmann, C. R., Bell, E., Sczyrba, A., Pun, J., Bekiranov, S., Gaasterland, T., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). Microarray-Based Analysis of Early Development in Xenopus Laevis. Developmental Biology. 236(1), 64-75. doi: 10.1006/dbio.2001.0298. PubMed PMID: 11456444
  66. Zohn, I. E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2001). Expression Cloning of Xenopus Os4, an Evolutionarily Conserved Gene, Which Induces Mesoderm and Dorsal Axis. Developmental Biology. 239(1), 118-131. doi: 10.1006/dbio.2001.0420. PubMed PMID: 11784023
  67. Altmann, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2002). Microarrays: Common Ground for Biologists and PhysicistsNature Neuroscience. 5(10), 931-931
  68. Brivanlou, A. H., and Darnell, J. E., Jr. (2002). Signal Transduction and the Control of Gene Expression. Science. 295(5556), 813-818. doi: 10.1126/science.1066355. Review. PubMed PMID: 11823631
  69. Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2002). Neural Induction, the Default Model and Embryonic Stem Cells. Nature Reviews. Neuroscience. 3(4), 271-280. doi: 10.1038/nrn786. PubMed PMID: 11967557
  70. Rho, J., Altmann, C. R., Socci, N. D., Merkov, L., Kim, N., So, H., Lee, O., Takami, M., Brivanlou, A. H., and Choi, Y. (2002). Gene Expression Profiling of Osteoclast Differentiation by Combined Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) and cDNA Microarray Analysis. DNA and Cell Biology. 21(8), 541-549. doi: 10.1089/104454902320308915. PubMed PMID: 12215257
  71. Altmann, C. R., Chang, C., Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., Bell, E., Heke, M., Rifkin, D. B., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2002). The Latent-TGF-β-Binding-Protein-1 (LTBP-1) Is Expressed in the Organizer and Regulates Nodal and Activin Signaling. Developmental Biology. 248(1), 118-127. PubMed PMID: 12142025
  72. Domingos, P. M., Obukhanych, T. V., Altmann, C. R., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2002). Cloning and Developmental Expression of Baf57 in Xenopus Laevis. Mechanisms of Development. 116(1-2), 177-181. PubMed PMID: 12128220
  73. Dubertret, B., Skourides, P., Norris, D. J., Noireaux, V., Brivanlou, A. H., and Libchaber, A. (2002). In Vivo Imaging of Quantum Dots Encapsulated in Phospholipid Micelles. Science. 298(5599), 1759-1762. doi: 10.1126/science.1077194. PubMed PMID: 12459582
  74. Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., Bell, E., Altmann, C. R., Vonica, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2002). Gene Profiling During Neural Induction in Xenopus Laevis: Regulation of BMP Signaling by Post-Transcriptional Mechanisms and TAB3, a Novel TAK1-Binding Protein. Development. 129(23), 5529-5540. PubMed PMID: 12403722
  75. Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2003). Molecules Take Center StageDevelopment, 130, 5558-5559.
  76. Cheng, S. K., Olale, F., Bennett, J. T., Brivanlou, A. H., and Schier, A. F. (2003). EGF-CFC Proteins Are Essential Coreceptors for the TGF-β Signals Vg1 and GDF1. Genes & Development. 17(1), 31-36. doi: 10.1101/gad.1041203. PubMed PMID: 12514096
  77. Levine, A. J., Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., Bell, E., North, A. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2003). Fluorescent Labeling of Endothelial Cells Allows in Vivo, Continuous Characterization of the Vascular Development of Xenopus Laevis. Developmental Biology. 254(1), 50-67. PubMed PMID: 12606281
  78. Chang, C., Eggen, B. J., Weinstein, D. C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2003). Regulation of Nodal and BMP Signaling by Tomoregulin-1 (X7365) through Novel Mechanisms. Developmental Biology. 255(1), 1-11. PubMed PMID: 12618130
  79. Bell, E., Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., Altmann, C. R., Vonica, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2003). Cell Fate Specification and Competence by Coco, a Maternal BMP, TGF-β and Wnt Inhibitor. Development. 130(7), 1381-1389. PubMed PMID: 12588853
  80. Brivanlou, A. H., Gage, F. H., Jaenisch, R., Jessell, T., Melton, D., and Rossant, J. (2003). Stem Cells. Setting Standards for Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Science. 300 (5621), 913-916. PubMed PMID: 12738841
  81. Sato, N., Sanjuán, I. M., Heke, M., Uchida, M., Naef, F., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2003). Molecular Signature of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Its Comparison with the Mouse. Developmental Biology. 260(2), 404-413. PubMed PMID: 12921741
  82. Meijer, L., Skaltsounis, A. L., Magiatis, P., Polychronopoulos, P., Knockaert, M., Leost, M., Ryan, X. P., Vonica, C. A., Brivanlou, A. H., Dajani, R., Crovace, C., Tarricone, C., Musacchio, A., Roe, S. M., Pearl, L., and Greengard, P. (2003). GSK-3-Selective Inhibitors Derived from Tyrian Purple Indirubins. Chemistry & Biology. 10(12), 1255-1266. PubMed PMID: 14700633
  83. Bell, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2004). Molecular Patterning of the Embryonic Brain The Vertebrate Organizer (pp. 299-313): Springer.
  84. Besser, D. (2004). Expression of Nodal, Lefty-a, and Lefty-B in Undifferentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells Requires Activation of Smad2/3The Journal of biological chemistry, 279(43), 45076-45084. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M404979200
  85. Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2004). Modulation of Bmp Signaling During Vertebrate Gastrulation. In C. Stern (Ed.), Gastrulation: From Cells to Embryo (pp. 475-504). Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
  86. Sato, N., Meijer, L., Skaltsounis, L., Greengard, P., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2004). Maintenance of Pluripotency in Human and Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells through Activation of Wnt Signaling by a Pharmacological GSK-3-Specific Inhibitor. Nature Medicine. 10(1), 55-63. Epub 2003 Dec 21. PubMed PMID: 14702635
  87. Cheng SK, Olale F, Brivanlou AH, Schier AF. (2004). Lefty blocks a subset of TGF-β signals by antagonizing EGF-CFC coreceptors. PLoS Biol. 2(2):E30. Epub 2004 Feb 17. PubMed PMID: 14966532
  88. Talikka, M., Stefani, G., Brivanlou, A. H., and Zimmerman, K. (2004). Characterization of Xenopus Phox2a and Phox2b Defines Expression Domains within the Embryonic Nervous System and Early Heart Field. Gene Expression Patterns: GEP. 4(5), 601-607. doi: 10.1016/j.modgep.2004.01.012. PubMed PMID: 15261839
  89. Noggle, S. A., Sato, N., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2005). Feeder Free Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. In A. Bongso & E. H. Lee (Eds.), Stem Cells: From Bench to Bedside (pp. 144-160): World Scientific Publishing Company.
  90. Noggle, S. A., James, D., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2005). A Molecular Basis for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency. Stem Cell Reviews. 1(2), 111-118. Review. PubMed PMID: 17142845
  91. Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2005). A Full Menu for Stem-Cell Research. Genome Biology. 6(3), 311. Epub 2005 Feb 25. PubMed PMID: 15774038
  92. Chamorro, M. N., Schwartz, D. R., Vonica, A., Brivanlou, A. H., Cho, K. R., and Varmus, H. E. (2005). FGF-20 and DKK1 Are Transcriptional Targets of β-Catenin and FGF-20 Is Implicated in Cancer and Development. The EMBO Journal. 24(1), 73-84. doi: 10.1038/sj.emboj.7600460. Epub 2004 Dec 9. PubMed PMID: 15592430
  93. James, D., Levine, A. J., Besser, D., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2005). TGF-β/Activin/Nodal Signaling Is Necessary for the Maintenance of Pluripotency in Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Development. 132(6), 1273-1282. doi: 10.1242/dev.01706. Epub 2005 Feb 9. PubMed PMID: 15703277
  94. Samad, T. A., Rebbapragada, A., Bell, E., Zhang, Y., Sidis, Y., Jeong, S. J., Campagna, J. A., Perusini, S., Fabrizio, D. A., Schneyer, A. L., Lin, H. Y., Brivanlou, A. H., Attisano, L., and Woolf, C. J. (2005). DRAGON, a Bone Morphogenetic Protein Co-Receptor. The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 280(14), 14122-14129. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M410034200. Epub 2005 Jan 25. PubMed PMID: 15671031
  95. Muñoz-Sanjuán, I., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2005). Induction of Ectopic Olfactory Structures and Bone Morphogenetic Protein Inhibition by Rossy, a Group XII Secreted Phospholipase A2. Molecular and Cellular Biology. 25(9), 3608-3619. doi: 10.1128/mcb.25.9.3608-3619.2005. PubMed PMID: 15831466
  96. Wysocka, J., Swigut, T., Milne, T. A., Dou, Y., Zhang, X., Burlingame, A. L., Roeder, R. G., Brivanlou, A. H., and Allis, C. D. (2005). WDR5 Associates with Histone H3 Methylated at K4 and Is Essential for H3 K4 Methylation and Vertebrate Development. Cell. 121(6), 859-872. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2005.03.036. PubMed PMID: 15960974
  97. Suárez-Fariñas, M., Noggle, S., Heke, M., Brivanlou, A. H., and Magnasco, M. O. (2005). Comparing Independent Microarray Studies: The Case of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. BMC Genomics. 6, 99. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-6-99. PubMed PMID: 16042783
  98. Sczyrba, A., Beckstette, M., Brivanlou, A. H., Giegerich, R., and Altmann, C. R. (2005). Xendb: Full Length cDNA Prediction and Cross Species Mapping in Xenopus Laevis. BMC Genomics. 6, 123. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-6-123. PubMed PMID: 16162280
  99. Knockaert, M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). Indirubin and Embryonic Stem Cells. In L. Meijer, N. Guyard, L. Skaltsounis & G. Eisenbrand (Eds.), Indirubin, the Red Shade of Indigo (pp. 269-277).
  100. Sato, N., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006a). Microarray Approach to Identify the Signaling Network Responsible for Self-Renewal of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Methods in Molecular Biology. 331, 267-283. doi: 10.1385/1-59745-046-4:267. PubMed PMID: 16881522
  101. Sato, N., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006b). Manipulation of Self-Renewal in Human Embryonic Stem Cells through a Novel Pharmacological GSK-3 Inhibitor. Methods in Molecular Biology. 331, 115-128. doi: 10.1385/1-59745-046-4:115. PubMed PMID: 16881513
  102. Levine, A. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006a). GDF3, a BMP Inhibitor, Regulates Cell Fate in Stem Cells and Early Embryos. Development. 133(2), 209-216. doi: 10.1242/dev.02192. Epub 2005 Dec 8. PubMed PMID: 16339188
  103. Vonica, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). An Obligatory Caravanserai Stop on the Silk Road to Neural Induction: Inhibition of BMP/GDF Signaling. Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology. 17(1), 117-132. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2005.11.013. Epub 2006 Mar 3. Review. PubMed PMID: 16516504
  104. Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). The RNA-Binding Protein, Vg1RBP, Is Required for Pancreatic Fate Specification. Developmental Biology. 292(2), 442-456. PubMed PMID: 16680827
  105. Levine, A. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006b). GDF3 at the Crossroads of TGF-β Signaling. Cell Cycle. 5(10), 1069-1073. Epub 2006 May 15. Review. PubMed PMID: 16721050
  106. James, D., Noggle, S. A., Swigut, T., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). Contribution of Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Mouse Blastocysts. Developmental Biology. 295(1), 90-102. doi: 10.1016/ j.ydbio.2006.03.026. PubMed PMID: 16769046
  107. Knockaert, M., Sapkota, G., Alarcón, C., Massagué, J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). Unique Players in the BMP Pathway: Small C-Terminal Domain Phosphatases Dephosphorylate Smad1 to Attenuate BMP Signaling. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 103(32), 11940-11945. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0605133103. Epub 2006 Aug 1. PubMed PMID: 16882717
  108. Tabibzadeh, S., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). Lefty at the Crossroads of "Stemness" and Differentiative Events. Stem Cells. 24(9), 1998-2006. doi: 10.1634/stemcells.2006-0075. Epub 2006 May 25. Review. PubMed PMID: 16728558
  109. Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2006). Guiding Embryonic Stem Cells Towards Differentiation: Lessons from Molecular Embryology. Current Opinion in Genetics & Development. 16(5), 469-475. doi: 10.1016/j.gde.2006.08.004. Epub 2006 Aug 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 16919445
  110. Chang, C., Brivanlou, A. H., and Harland, R. M. (2006). Function of the Two Xenopus Smad4s in Early Frog Development. The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 281(41), 30794-30803. doi: 10.1074/ jbc.M607054200. Epub 2006 Aug 14. PubMed PMID: 16908518
  111. Sapkota, G., Knockaert, M., Alarcón, C., Montalvo, E., Brivanlou, A. H., and Massagué, J. (2006). Dephosphorylation of the Linker Regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 by Small C-Terminal Domain Phosphatases Has Distinct Outcomes for Bone Morphogenetic Protein and Transforming Growth Factor-Β Pathways. The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 281(52), 40412-40419. doi: 10.1074/ jbc.M610172200. Epub 2006 Nov 2. PubMed PMID: 17085434
  112. Levine, A. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2007a). Molecular Basis of Pluripotency. In A. Atala & R. Lanza (Eds.), Principles of Regenerative Medicine (pp. 118-127): Academic Press.
  113. Noggle, S., Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2007). In Vivo Assays for Human Embryonic Stem Cells. In S. Sullivan, C. A. Cowan & K. Eggan (Eds.), Human Embryonic Stem Cells: The Practical Handbook: John Wiley & Sons.
  114. Dreesen, O., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2007). Signaling Pathways in Cancer and Embryonic Stem Cells. Stem Cell Reviews. 3(1), 7-17. Review. PubMed PMID: 17873377
  115. Sapkota, G., Alarcón, C., Spagnoli, F. M., Brivanlou, A. H., and Massagué, J. (2007). Balancing Bmp Signaling through Integrated Inputs into the Smad1 Linker. Molecular cell. 25(3), 441-454. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2007.01.006. PubMed PMID: 17289590
  116. Vonica, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2007). The Left-Right Axis Is Regulated by the Interplay of Coco, Xnr1 and Derriére in Xenopus Embryos. Developmental Biology. 303(1), 281-294. doi: 10.1016/ j.ydbio.2006.09.039. Epub 2006 Sep 28. PubMed PMID: 17239842
  117. Levine, A. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2007b). Proposal of a Model of Mammalian Neural Induction. Developmental Biology. 308(2), 247-256. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2007.05.036. Epub 2007 Jun 2. Review. PubMed PMID: 17585896
  118. Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2008). The Gata5 Target, TGIF2, Defines the Pancreatic Region by Modulating BMP Signals within the Endoderm. Development. 135(3), 451-461. doi: 10.1242/dev.008458. Epub 2007 Dec 19. PubMed PMID: 18094028
  119. Yan, C. Y., Skourides, P., Chang, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2009). Samba, a Xenopus HnRNP Expressed in Neural and Neural Crest Tissues. Developmental Dynamics: An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists, 238(1), 204-209. doi: 10.1002/dvdy.21826. PubMed PMID: 19097051
  120. Levine, A. J., Levine, Z. J., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2009). GDF3 Is a BMP Inhibitor That Can Activate Nodal Signaling Only at Very High Doses. Developmental Biology. 325(1), 43-48. doi: 10.1016/ j.ydbio.2008.09.006. Epub 2008 Sep 18. PubMed PMID: 18823971
  121. Rosa, A., Spagnoli, F. M., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2009). The Mir-430/427/302 Family Controls Mesendodermal Fate Specification Via Species-Specific Target Selection. Developmental Cell. 16(4), 517-527. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2009.02.007. PubMed PMID: 19386261
  122. Francois, P., Vonica, A., Brivanlou, A. H., and Siggia, E. D. (2009). Scaling of BMP Gradients in Xenopus Embryos. Nature. 461(7260), E1; discussion E2. PubMed PMID: 19736667
  123. Lacoste, A., Berenshteyn, F., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2009). An Efficient and Reversible Transposable System for Gene Delivery and Lineage-Specific Differentiation in Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Cell Stem Cell. 5(3), 332-342. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2009.07.011. Erratum in: Cell Stem Cell. 2009 Nov 6;5(5):568. PubMed PMID: 19733544
  124. Di Pasquale, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2009). Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) Acts as a BMP and Wnt Inhibitor During Early Embryogenesis. The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 284(38), 26127-26136. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M109.036608. Epub 2009 Jun 24. PubMed PMID: 19553676
  125. Rosa, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2009). MicroRNAs in Early Vertebrate Development. Cell Cycle. 8(21), 3513-20. Epub 2009 Nov 18. Review. PubMed PMID: 19875943
  126. Singh, H., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2010). The Molecular Design of Pluripotency. In A. Atala, R. Lanza, J. A. Thomson & R. Nerem (Eds.), Principles of Regenerative Medicine, Second Edition (pp. 87-94): Academic Press.
  127. Shimomura, Y., Agalliu, D., Vonica, A., Luria, V., Wajid, M., Baumer, A., Belli, S., Petukhova, L., Schinzel, A., Brivanlou, A. H., Barres, B. A., and Christiano, A. M. (2010). APCDD1 Is a Novel Wnt Inhibitor Mutated in Hereditary Hypotrichosis Simplex. Nature. 464(7291), 1043-1047. doi: 10.1038/nature08875. PubMed PMID: 20393562
  128. Rosa, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2010). Synthetic mRNAs: Powerful Tools for Reprogramming and Differentiation of Human Cells. Cell Stem Cell. 7(5), 549-550. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2010.10.002. PubMed PMID: 21040893
  129. Rosa, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2011). A Regulatory Circuitry Comprised of miR-302 and the Transcription Factors OCT4 and NR2F2 Regulates Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. The EMBO Journal. 30, 237-248. doi: 10.1038/emboj.2011.319. Epub 2010 Dec 10. PubMed PMID: 21151097
  130. Vonica, A., Rosa, A., Arduini, B. L., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2011). Apobec2, a Selective Inhibitor of TGF-β Signaling, Regulates Left-Right Axis Specification During Early Embryogenesis. Developmental Biology. 350(1), 13-23. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2010.09.016. Epub 2010 Sep 27. PubMed PMID: 20880495
  131. Hata, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2012). A Taste of TGF-β in Tuscany. Development. 139(3), 449-453. doi: 10.1242/dev.067249. PubMed PMID: 22223676
  132. Warmflash, A., Zhang, Q., Sorre, B., Vonica, A., Siggia, E. D., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2012). Dynamics of TGF-β Signaling Reveal Adaptive and Pulsatile Behaviors Reflected in the Nuclear Localization of Transcription Factor Smad4. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(28), E1947-1956. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1207607109. Epub 2012 Jun 11. PubMed PMID: 22689943
  133. Gao, H., Chakraborty, G., Lee-Lim, A. P., Mo, Q., Decker, M., Vonica, A., Shen, R., Brogi, E., Brivanlou, A. H., and Giancotti, F. G. (2012). The Bmp Inhibitor Coco Reactivates Breast Cancer Cells at Lung Metastatic Sites. Cell. 150(4), 764-779. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.06.035. Erratum in: Cell. 2012 Dec 7;151(6):1386-8. PubMed PMID: 22901808
  134. Warmflash, A., Arduini, B. L., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2012). The Molecular Circuitry Underlying Pluripotency in Embryonic Stem Cells. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Systems Biology and Medicine. 4(5), 443-456. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1182. Epub 2012 Jul 3. Review. PubMed PMID: 22761038
  135. Warmflash, A., Siggia, E. D., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2012). Signaling Dynamics and Embryonic Development. Cell Cycle. 11(19), 3529-3530. doi: 10.4161/cc.21964. Epub 2012 Aug 30. PubMed PMID: 22935712
  136. Arduini, B. L., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2012). Modulation of Foxd3 Activity in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Directs Pluripotency and Paraxial Mesoderm Fates. Stem Cells. 30(10), 2188-2198. doi: 10.1002/stem.1200. PubMed PMID: 22887036
  137. Kintner, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2013). Neural Induction Embryonic Stem Cells. In J. Rubenstein & P. Rakic (Eds.), Patterning and Cell Type Specification in the Developing CNS and PNS: Comprehensive Developmental Neuroscience (Vol. 1): Academic Press.
  138. Ozair, M. Z., Noggle, S., Warmflash, A., Krzyspiak, J. E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2013). SMAD7 Directly Converts Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Telencephalic Fate by a Default Mechanism. Stem Cells. 31(1), 35-47. doi: 10.1002/stem. .1246. PubMed PMID: 23034881
  139. Ozair, M. Z., Kintner, C., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2013). Neural Induction and Early Patterning in Vertebrates. Wiley interdisciplinary reviews. Developmental Biology. 2(4), 479-498. doi: 10.1002/wdev.90. Epub 2012 Oct 15. Review. PubMed PMID: 24014419
  140. Whitman, M., Rosen, V., Brivanlou, A. H., Groppe, J. C., Sebald, W., and Mueller, T. (2013). Regarding the Mechanism of Action of a Proposed Peptide Agonist of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Activin-Like Kinase 3. Nature Medicine. 19(7), 809-810. doi: 10.1038/nm. 3080. PubMed PMID: 23836213
  141. Rosa, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2013). Regulatory Non-Coding RNAs in Pluripotent Stem Cells. International journal of molecular sciences. Developmental Biology. 14(7), 14346-14373. doi: 10.3390/ijms140714346. Review. PubMed PMID: 23852015
  142. Bates, T. J., Vonica, A., Heasman, J., Brivanlou, A. H., and Bell, E. (2013). Coco Regulates Dorsoventral Specification of Germ Layers Via Inhibition of TGF-β Signalling. Development. 140(20), 4177-4181. doi: 10.1242/dev. 095521. Epub 2013 Sep 11. PubMed PMID: 24026124
  143. Rosa, A., Papaioannou, M. D., Krzyspiak, J. E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2014). Mir-373 Is Regulated by TGF-β Signaling and Promotes Mesendoderm Differentiation in Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Developmental Biology. 391(1):81-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2014.03.020. Epub 2014 Apr 4. PubMed PMID: 24709321
  144. Ismailoglu, I., Chen, Q., Popowski, M., Yang, L., Gross, S. S., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2014). Huntingtin protein is essential for mitochondrial metabolism, bioenergetics and structure in murine embryonic stem cells. Developmental Biology. 391(2), 230-240. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2014.04.005. Epub 2014 Apr 26. PubMed PMID: 24780625
  145. Warmflash, A., Sorre, B., Etoc, F., Siggia, E. D., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2014). A method to recapitulate early embryonic spatial patterning in human embryonic stem cells. Nature Methods. 1(8):847-54. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.3016. Epub 2014 Jun 29. PubMed PMID: 24973948
  146. Sorre, B., Warmflash, A., Brivanlou, A. H., and Siggia, E. D. (2014). Encoding of temporal signals by the TGF-β pathway and implications for embryonic patterning. Developmental Cell. 30(3):334-42. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2014.05.022. Epub 2014 Jul 24. PubMed PMID: 25065773
  147. Warmflash, A., Zhang, Q., Brivanlou, A. H. and Siggia, E. D. (2014).  Comment on “Controlling long-term signaling: receptor dynamics determine attenuation and refractory behavior of the TGF-β pathway”- Smad2/3 activity does not predict the dynamics of transcription. Science Signaling. 7(344):lc1. doi: 10.1126/scisignal.2005562. PubMed PMID: 25249655
  148. Ruzo, A., Ismailoglu, I., Popowski, M., Haremaki, T., Croft, G., Deglincerti, A. and Brivanlou, A. H. (2015). Discovery of novel isoforms of huntingtin reveals a new hominid-specific exon. PLoS One. 0(5):e0127687. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0127687. eCollection 2015. PubMed PMID: 26010866
  149. Deglincerti, A. and Brivanlou, A.H. (2015). The generation of sex cells. Cell Research. 25(3):267-8. doi: 10.1038/cr.2015.18. Epub 2015 Feb 20. PubMed PMID: 25698577
  150. Deglincerti, A., Warmflash, A., Haremaki, T., Zhang, Q., Sorre, B. and Brivanlou, A. H. (2015). Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling. Development. 142(15):2678-85. doi: 10.1242/dev.122358. Epub 2015 Jun 26. PubMed PMID: 26116664
  151. Deglincerti, A., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2015). Human SCNT Gets a Boost from Histone Demethylation. Cell Stem Cell. 17(6):641-2. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2015.11.014.26637938
  152. Haremaki, T., Deglincerti, A. and Brivanlou, A. H. (2015). Huntingtin is required for ciliogenesis and neurogenesis during early Xenopus development. Developmental Biology. 408(2):305-15. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2015.07.013. Epub 2015 Jul 17. PubMed PMID: 26192473
  153. Deglincerti, A., Etoc, F., Ozair M.Z., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2016). Self-organization of Spatial Patterning in Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Curr Topics Dev. Biol. (116: 99-113).
  154. Sato, N., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2016). Microarray Approach to Identify the Signaling Network Responsible for Self-Renewal of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Methods in Molecular Biology. 1307:71-88. doi: 10.1007/7651_2015_244. PubMed PMID: 25990842
  155. Deglincerti, A., Croft, G., Pietila, L., Zernicka-Goetz, M., Siggia, E., and Brivanlou, A. H. (2016). Self-organization of the in vitro attached human embryo. Nature. 553, 251-254.
  156. Deglincerti, A., Etoc, F., Guerra, M.C., Martyn, I., Metzger, J., Ruzo, A., Simunovic, M., Yoney, A., Brivanlou, A. H., Siggia, E., Warmflash, A. (2016). Self-organization of human embryonic stem cells on micropatterns. Nature Protocols. 11, 2223-2232. doi:10.1038/nprot.2016.131
  157. Etoc, F., Metzger, J., Ruzo, A., Kirst, C., Yoney, A., Ozair, Z., Brivanlou, A. H., and Siggia, E. (2016). A balance between secreted inhibitors and edge-sensing controls gastruloid self-organization. Dev. Cell. 39, 1-14.
  158. Rosa, A. and Brivanlou, A. H. (2016). Role of microRNAs in zygotic genome activation: modulation of mRNA during embryogenesis. Methods in Molecular Biology. (submitted).
  159. Qi, Y., Zhang, X-J., Renier, N., Wu, Z., Atkin, A., Sun, Z., Ozair, Z., Tchieu, J., Zimmer, B., Fattahi, F., Ganat, Y., Azevedo, R., Zeltner, N., Brivanlou  A. H., Karayiorgou, M., Gogos, J., Tomishima, M., Tessier-Lavigne, M., Shi, S-H., Studer, L. (2016). Combined small molecule inhibition accelerates the derivation of functional cortical neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.  Nature Biotech. (in press).
  160. Simunovic, M. and Brivanlou, A.H. (2016). Of embryoids, organoids and gastruloids. Development (in review).
  161. Ozair M.Z.,
  162. Yoney, A., Martyn, I., Siggia, E., and Brivanlou, A.H. (2016). Micropattern technology: new tools lead to new discoveries. (in preparation).

EDUCATION

1991 – 1994            Postdoctoral training, Dr. Douglas Melton Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Harvard University

1990 – 1991            Postdoctoral training, Dr. Richard Harland Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, UC Berkeley.

1985 – 1990            Ph.D. in Molecular Biology, Dr. Richard Harland Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, UC Berkeley.

1976 – 1982            MS Biochemistry, Université des Sciences et Techniques du Languedoc, Montpellier, France.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2000 – present       Robert & Harriet Heilbrunn Professor, Head of Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Molecular Embryology, The Rockefeller University.

2012 – present       Adjunct Professor, Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Columbia University

1997 – 2000            Associate Professor, Head of Laboratory, Molecular Embryology, The Rockefeller University.

1994 – 1997            Assistant Professor, Head of Laboratory, Molecular Embryology, The Rockefeller University.

1983 – 1985            Research Scientist, International Genetic Engineering Inc. (INGENE), Santa Monica, California.

1982 – 1983            Research Assistant, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles.

RESEARCH FUNDING AND GRANTS

2016– 2019             STARR Foundation. Generation and functional characterization of primordial germ cells derived from hESCs.

2016– 2018             STARR Foundation. Role of presenilins in axon ER calcium handling and human synaptic function.

2016– 2017             Rumi Scientific Inc. Screening of potentially therapeutic small molecule compounds using a novel phenotypic assay for Huntington’s Disease.

2016– 2017             CHDI Foundation. Differentiation, validation and banking of HD allelic series isogenic stem cell lines for the functional characterization of wildtype and mutant HD proteins in human embryonic stem cells and neuronal cells.

2015– 2017             CHDI Foundation. Functional characterization of wildtype and mutant HD proteins in human embryonic stem cells and neuronal cells.

2015 – 2016            Robertson Foundation. Novel screening platform to identify therapeutic compounds to treat Huntington's Disease.

2015 – 2016            CRO Grant QR Pharma. Effects of Posiphen on Huntingtin protein expression in a human model of Huntington’s Disease.

2015 – 2015            Robertson Foundation. Construction of patient-specific, stem cell-based 3D skin models for psoriasis.

2014 – 2017            STARR Foundation. Functional Characterization of SCNT-Derived Patient-Specific Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

2014 – 2016            STARR Foundation. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Ectodermal Lineage Diversification in hESCs.

2014 – 2015            Robertson Foundation. Novel screens for neuroprotective targets using human cortical neurons.

2014 – 2015            Robertson Foundation. Stem cell-based approaches to treat chronic skin wounds by generation of autologous skin for tissue grafts and patches.

2014– 2015             STARR Foundation. Regulating hematopoietic stem cell quiescence via temporal encoding of TGF-beta signals.

2014 – 2019            NIH/DHHS R01. Dissecting embryonic axis formation using micropatterned hESC colony architecture.

2014– 2015             CHDI Foundation. Creation and characterization of mutant huntingtin syngenic human embryonic stem cells.

2014 – 2018            Tri-SCI Starr Foundation. The Rockefeller University Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Core Facility. Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2013 – 2018            Tri-SCI Starr Foundation. The Rockefeller University Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Core Facility. Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2013 – 2017            New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), New York State Stem Cell Science (NYSTEM). Molecular Analysis of Embryonic Stem Cells. Investigator Initiated Grant C028128

2013 – 2016            New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), New York State Stem Cell Science (NYSTEM). Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to defined neocortical subtypes.

2013 – 2015            NIH R21. National Institute of Child and Human Development. Molecular Analysis of Embryonic Stem Cells.  NIH R21 HD072369

2013– 2015             STARR Foundation. Generation of an in vitro attachment platform for mouse and human blastocysts to study molecular and cellular aspects of post-implantation differentiation.

2013 – 2015            NIH/NICHD. Molecular analysis of embryonic stem cells.

2013 – 2015            Tri-SCI Starr Foundation. Generation of an in vitro attachment platform for mouse and human blastocysts to study molecular and cellular aspects of post-implantation differentiation. Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant # 2013-026.

2013 – 2015            Tri-SCI Starr Foundation. Regulating hematopoietic stem cell quiescence via temporal encoding of TGFβ signals. Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant # 2013-030.

2012 – 2016            NIH R01. National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Dynamic readout of TGFβ signaling and modeling of cell fate specification in human embryonic stem cells, NIH R01 GM101653

2011 – 2015            NIH R01. National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Analysis of TGFβ-regulated microRNAs in hESC stemness and differentiation. NIH R01 GM097615

2011 – 2013            Cure Huntington’s Disease Initiative (CHDI).  Functional characterization of wildtype HD proteins during Xenopus embryogenesis, and human telencephalic development. Single PI Research Grant.

2009 – 2014            New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), New York State Stem Cell Science (NYSTEM). Shared Facilities and Resources for Stem Cell Research at The Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medical College. Collaborative Grant C024180

2007 – 2010            Tri-SCI Starr Foundation, The Rockefeller University Derivation Core Facility. Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2007 – 2009            Tri-SCI Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative: Derivation of hESC from Fanconi Anemia Embryos.  Collaborator Dr. Arleen Auerbach (The Rockefeller University). Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2007 – 2009            Tri-SCI Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative: Chemical Screen of small compounds involved in maintenance of pluripotency in hESCs. Collaborator Dr. Tarun Kapoor (The Rockefeller University). Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2007 – 2009            Tri-SCI Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative: High throughput chemical screen human embryonic stem cells. Collaborator Dr. Lorenz Studer (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center). Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2007 – 2009            Tri-SCI Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative: Monitoring self-renewal in induced pluripotent cells and cancer cells. Collaborator Dr. Anthony Brown (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center). Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative Grant.

2004 – 2010            NIH R01. National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Development and Aging.  Molecular Analysis of Human ES Cells. NIH R01 GM073379-06

2004 – 2006            McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience. Molecular Basis of neural induction in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

2003 – 2006            Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Program Project Grant, Molecular Basis of Stemness in HESCs and its relevance to Pancreatic Development. (Three years support).

2002 – 2008            The Rockefeller University.  Basic Research on Human Embryonic stem cells. (Six years support).

2002 – 2007            NIH R01. National Institute of General Medical Sciences. TGF-ß Signaling in Vertebrate Mesoderm Induction. NIH R01 GM066977

2000 – 2005            National Institute of General Medical Sciences. NIH/NIGMS Training grant for Graduate Students (Dr. Günter Blobel PI).

1999 – 2000            Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc. Research Grant.

1998 – 2003            NIH R01. National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Molecular Basis of Vertebrate Lens Induction. NIH R01 grant from the Eye Institute.

1996 – 2009            NIH R01. National Institute of Child and Human Development, Molecular Basis of Neural Development in Xenopus.  NIH R01 HD032105-11.

HONORS, NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL AWARDS

2012                          The Rockefeller University Teaching Award

2000                          Ruth and Milton Steinbach Fund

1997                          The John Merck Award

1996                          The Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

1996                          Wilson S. Stone Memorial Award

1996                          The McKnight Scholar Award

1996                          The Japan award

1996                          The Klingenstein Award

1995                          The Searle Scholar Award

1994                          The Irma T. Hirschl-Monique Weill-Caulier Trust Career Scientist Award

1994                          The NIH, James A. Shannon Director's Award

1991                          NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship.

TEACHING

2009 – present       Co-organizer, Stem Cells in Tissue Morphogenesis and Cancer, a course for graduate and MD-Ph.D. students, The Rockefeller University.

2004 – 2006            MSKCC Stem Cell course.

1994 – present       Co-lecturer, Eukaryotic Gene Expression for graduate and MD-Ph.D. students, The Rockefeller University.

Co-lecturer, The Development of the Central Nervous System for graduate and MD-Ph.D. students, The Rockefeller University.

Co-lecturer, Embryology course for medical students, Cornell Medical School.

Co-lecturer, Developmental Biology course for graduate and MD-Ph.D. students, The Rockefeller University.

Co-lecturer, Developmental Neurobiology course, Columbia Medical School, College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

OTHER SCIENTIFIC AFFILIATION

2015 – present       Co-founder, Rumi Scientific, LLC.

2015 – present       Co-founder, OvaNova Laboratories LLC.

2014 – present       Board Member, Research Foundation to Cure AIDS, Inc.

2013 – present       Member, Scientific Advisory Council Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance (PSSCRA), New York.

2012 – present       Member, Postdoctoral Awards Review Committee, The Rockefeller University.

2008 – 2011            Senior Faculty Representative, Academic Council, The Rockefeller University.

2007 – present       Director, Tri-Institutional Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derivation Unit, New York (Memorial Sloan Kettering, Cornell Medical School, The Rockefeller University).

2005 – present       Chair, Steering committee for the establishment of the Tri-institutional Stem Cell Institute, New York (Memorial Sloan Kettering, Cornell Medical School, The Rockefeller University).

2005 – present       Member, P-20 Study Section for Exploratory Grants for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Center for Scientific Review, NIH.

2005 – present       Member, Grants Review Working Group, California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).

2004 – present       Member, DEV2 study section, Biology of Development and Aging, Center for Scientific Review, NIH.

2004 – 2006            Member, Genomics Resource Center Committee, The Rockefeller University.

2004 – 2005            Member, Bioethics Committee, The Rockefeller University.

2003 – 2008            Member, Steering committee for the creation of the Tri-institutional Stem Cell Institute, New York (Memorial Sloan Kettering, Cornell Medical School, The Rockefeller University).

2002 – 2003            Organizer, The New York Academy of Sciences and The Rockefeller University Workshop: “Cellular and molecular standards for the study of human embryonic stem cells.”

2002                          Organizer, NIH Workshop: Setting Priorities for Functional Molecular Neuroanatomy in the Post-Genomic Era. Laguna Beach, California.

2001 – 2002            Member, NIH study sections CDF4, CDF5 and Genome Study Sections.

2001 – present       Member, The Harvey Society, The Rockefeller University.

2000 – 2001            Chairman, NICHD and NIH Workshop: Identifying Genetic and Genomic Need for Xenopus Research.

1998 – 2005            Chairperson, Scientific Advisory Board, Protein/DNA Sequencing Facility, The Rockefeller University.

1998 – 2002            Member, Faculty Nominating Committee. The Rockefeller University.

1998 – 2002            Member, Graduate Recruitment Committee, The Rockefeller University.

1998 – 2000            Consultant, Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts.

1995 – 1999            Junior Faculty Representative, Academic Council, The Rockefeller University.

 EDITORIAL BOARDS OF SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS

2009 – present       Member, Editorial Board of PLOS1

1999 – present       Member, Editorial Board of Developmental Biology

1999 – present       Member, Editorial Board of Mechanisms of Development

1999 – 2008            Member, Editorial Board of Development

PATENTS

  1. United States Application Number 60/448,257, entitled Nucleotide and protein sequence of Coco genes and methods based thereon filed on February 19, 2003 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  2. United States Application Number 60/531,250, entitled Maintenance of embryonic stem cells by the GSK-3 inhibitor 6-Bromoindirubin-3’-Oxime filed on December 19, 2003 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  3. United States Application Number 60/219,658, entitled Assays and materials for embryonic gene expression filed on July 21, 2000 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  4. United States Patent Application Number 09/306,042, entitled Lens transcriptional control elements and methods of use thereof filed on May 7, 1998 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  5. United States Patent Application Number 09/755,325, entitled Translation initiation factor 4AIII, and methods of use thereof filed June 1, 1998 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  6. United States Patent Application Number 09/070,707, entitled A vertebrate lens produced by selectively inducing lens development in an ectodermal cell and methods of use thereof filed August 23, 2000 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  7. United States Patent Application Serial Number 09/344,880, entitled Peptide growth factor having epidermal inducing activity filed October 30, 2000 by Ali H. Brivanlou.
  8. United States Patent Number 5,952,213 entitled A novel SRC-family kinase and methods of use thereof by Ali H. Brivanlou issued September 14, 1999.
  9. United States Patent Number WO 95/10611 entitled Methods of inducing and maintaining neuronal cell, by Douglas A. Melton and Ali H. Brivanlou, issued April 20, 1995.

ART FORUMS

2010 - present        Advisory Committee Member

dOCTUMENTA(13), contemporary art.

2015                          Exhibition: “Amphibious Envelope”

Chicago Architecture Biennial, Sullivan Galleries at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

2013                          BIO-DESIGN. Embryology, Architecture, and Innovation.

Columbia University School of Architecture

2013                          Cameo appearance in the feature film “The Fly Room” portraying scientist Edmond Wilson (Columbia University, 1927). Director Alexis Gambis

2012                          Keynote presentation, Kassel, Germany: "The Reversal of Time"

dOCTUMENTA(13), contemporary art.

2005                          World Exposition: “BioTechnology and a New Global Society”

USA Pavilion, Aichi, Japan, March 25 – September 25.

ESI design Edwin Schlosberg.

2004                          Exhibition: “The Art of Science”

International Museum of Photography, New York, NY, March 12 – May 30.